With the holidays quickly approaching, I wanted to see what others on this forum thought about emailing "seasons greeting" cards to clients, rather than sending real cards through the  mail. On the plus side are the cost-savings, it's easy and convenient to email, and it's the green way to go. But will clients think this is cheap and tacky? 

What do you do? Thanks for your input!

Jesse

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It sounds like a great holiday idea because it's green and clients may appreciate that it doesn't add clutter to their house. Other types of cards like thank you cards I feel should be sent physically.

I agree with Soynia, I think there used to be more of a feeling that e-cards were tacky, but if you bill it as a "green" way to send your thanks, I think many clients will appreciate that more than a paper card!

I think e-cards have now become a perfectly acceptable was of communicating with clients - depending on the type of e-card chosen. I've gotten a few over the years that are a bit too cutesy or seem more appropriate for a relative/close friend than a business client. As long as you keep the design professional, I think it's a great green idea, especially if you take the opportunity to give clients a 'thank you' offer to be used as a post-holiday "pick me up". This could be as simple as an easy add-on treatment or a decorative envelope filled with product samples to be given with their next service appointment. Clients see this as a nice gift and it helps keep your books filled in January and February.

hi there, I prefer hand written thank you cards via mail.  I think it shows you care enough to sit and write to them, address their envelope, and get to a post office.

This is great feedback. Thanks for taking the time to respond. From what I'm hearing the e-cards would be acceptable for the holidays as long as they are professional, and to too cutesy or personal. Paper cards would be more appropriate for special thank yous (like for a referral) or for something more personal, like a Birthday card. Thanks again!

You are very welcome Jesse:) I agree.

I think e-cards give you more room to wish them "seasons greetings" and also write important reminders about your spa promotions and events! Win/win!

 

Nothing can really replace a hand written note, but I think saving those for personal occasions (b-day, thank you after making large purchase, etc etc) are OK to do. Like Soynia said about clutter, I feel the same way. I can't stand paper piling up at my house- even if it is something nice like holiday cards.

I was torn because I receive SO many emails that I don't want to the cyberspace clutter, and some people really value receiving an unexpected piece of mail that isn't a bill! So, maybe the answer is to customize the list, and email those who are more in tune with being green, but also recognize those who might value the actual card sent snail mail. Again, thank you for your input. It's made me really think this through!

The majority of my clients love all the new techie ways to communicate these days but I do have some "old school" clients. I would send my tech savvy clients the e-card and hand write my old clients a personal card. 

Diane, that makes a lot of sense. Thanks!

I personally love email and the idea of emailing cards but a few biz classes I have taken are saying to send cards in the mail.  The argument is that people get too much email as it is and sometimes it may even go into their spam folder and they never get it.  A lot of people are going green which is great but when is the last time you got a card in the mail?  Probably been a while, but when you get mail, think about how excited you get.  I like to put all of my cards out on display and if everyone goes green then you have nothing to display.  I am on the fence about it....only my problem is that I don't have address info on any client forms because I figure...I will just always email, so I didn't do myself any justice in that sense.  :).

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